Our Purpose

For generations farmers have fed and fueled our nation, with their hands in the soil and heart in the job. They are passionate about the soil that provides for their families and the environment where they live and work every day.

Farmers are making a difference in improving Iowa’s water quality and conserving our soil for future generations. The Iowa Agriculture Water Alliance provides the support and coordination to get it done.

Our Mission

IAWA is increasing the pace and scale of farmer-led efforts to improve water quality in Iowa.

Our Motivation

We are all connected by water. From the tap water we drink, to the rivers we enjoy for boating and fishing, and the rain that nourishes our crops, water is important for everyone.

Our Impact

To date, we have secured more than $150 million of investment and resources to help farmers, landowners, and partners improve water quality.

We have connected more than 100 unique organizations to work together to improve water quality including farmers, agricultural associations, conservation organizations, federal, state, and local government leaders, businesses, academic institutions, and urban representatives.

We work with our partners to educate farmers and landowners across the state and inform them of conservation opportunities.

Spotlight Stories

  • Big Soil Health Event in Cedar Falls to showcase farmer successes

    Big Soil Health Event in Cedar Falls to showcase farmer successes

    By Dan Looker, IAWA contributor AMES, Iowa (IAWA) – Building healthy soil takes work, investment, and time. It can be years before tests show increases in stable organic matter and benefits are seen… at least, that’s a common belief among many people. But that’s not quite right, says Jerry Hatfield, a retired USDA-ARS agronomist and[...]Read More »
  • Stream restorations are part of the equation to reducing nutrients in Iowa water 

    Stream restorations are part of the equation to reducing nutrients in Iowa water 

    NORTH RACCOON WATERSHED, Iowa (IAWA) – Many farmers have old oxbow scars on their properties, but they don’t even realize it. Restoring them can make a big difference for water quality.   Oxbow scars are “u-shaped” stream beds that fill with eroded sediment. They often end up being wet spots in a field that have consistently[...]Read More »
  • Slifka recognized as 2022 Coordinator of the Year in fifth annual IAWA Iowa Watershed Awards

    Slifka recognized as 2022 Coordinator of the Year in fifth annual IAWA Iowa Watershed Awards

    Hunter Slifka, watershed project coordinator for the Turkey River Headwaters & Chihak Creek in NE Iowa, was honored as the 2022 Watershed Coordinator of the Year by the Iowa Agriculture Water Alliance (IAWA) during the fifth annual Iowa Watershed Awards program. With Slifka’s dedication to water quality in his 62,000-acre watershed, cover crops have expanded from[...]Read More »

Count Me In!

I want to invest in the conservation of Iowa’s most important resources.